NCERT Class 10 English Chapter 2 First Flight Answers

NCERT Class 10 English Chapter 2: Nelson Mandela Long Walk to Freedom and the poem A Tiger in the Zoo complete in-text (Oral Comprehension Check) and end-text questions and answers are given below. The solutions are updated for the academic session 2021-2022.

NCERT Class 10 English Chapter 2 First Flight

Class 10
Subject English – First Flight
Chapter 2
  • Nelson Mandela Long Walk to Freedom
  • A Tiger in the Zoo (Poem)

Class 10 English Chapter 2 In-text Answers

Get NCERT class 10 English chapter 2 Nelson Mandela Long Walk to Freedom all the in-text oral comprehension check of pages no. 18, 21, and 24 all questions with proper answers given below.

Oral Comprehension Cheak [Page No. 18]

Question 1

Where did the ceremonies take place? Can You name any public buildings in India that are made of sandstone?

Answer

The ceremonies took place in the sandstone amphitheater formed by the Union Building in Pretoria.

The Parliament House in New Delhi, the Rashtrapati Bhavan in New Delhi, the Supreme Court of India in New Delhi, and Madras High Court in Chennai are some examples of Indian public buildings that are made of sandstone.

Question 2

Can you say how 10 May is an ‘autumn day’ in South Africa?

Answer

10 May is an autumn day in South Africa because on this day there was the largest gathering of international leaders on South African soil for the installation of South Africa’s first democratic, non-racial government.

Question 3

At the beginning of his speech, Mandela mentions “an extraordinary human disaster”. What does he mean by this? What is the “glorious… human achievement” he speaks of at the end?

Answer

The ‘extraordinary human disaster’ that Mandela mentioned at the beginning of his speech refers to the inhuman practice of apartheid i.e., the racial discrimination suffered by the blacks at the hands of whites in South Africa. In the end, the ‘glorious… human achievement’ that he spoke of refers to the establishment of South Africa’s first democratic, non-racial government.

Question 4

What does Mandela thank the international leaders for?

Answer

Mandela thanks the international leaders for having come to take possession of the people as it was the victory of human dignity.

Question 5

What ideals does he set out for the future of South Africa?

Answer

He aims to liberate his people from various bondages like poverty, deprivation, suffering, gender, and other discrimination.

 

Oral Comprehension Check [Page No. 21]

Question 1

What do the military generals do? How has their attitude changed and why?

Answer

The military generals saluted Mandela and pledged their loyalty. Their attitude had changed because Mandela was their president then.

Question 2

Why were two national anthems sung?

Answer

On the day of the inauguration, two national anthems were sung, one by the whites and the other by blacks. This symbolized the equality of blacks and whites.

Question 3

How does Mandela describe the systems of government in his country (i) in the first decade, and (ii) in the final decade, of the twentieth century?

Answer

(i) In the first decade of the twentieth century, the white-skinned people of South Africa patched up their differences and created a system of racial domination against the dark-skinned people of their own land, thus creating the basis of one of the harshest and most inhumane societies the world had ever known.

(ii) In the last decade of the twentieth century, the previous system had been overturned forever and replaced by one that recognized the rights and freedoms of all peoples, regardless of the color of their skin.

Question 4

What does courage mean to Mandela?

Answer

According to Mandela courage is not the absence of fear, but the victory over it.

Question 5

Which does he think natural, to love or to hate?

Answer

For Mandela, love comes more naturally to the human heart than hate.

 

Oral Comprehension Check [Page No. 24]

Question 1

What “twin obligations” does Mandela mention?

Answer

Mandela mentions two obligations. The first one is man’s obligation to his family, his parents, his wife, and his children. The second is to his people, his community, and his country.

Question 2

What did being free mean to Mandela as a boy and as a student? How does he contrast these “transitory freedoms” with “the basic and honorable freedoms”?

Answer

As a boy, Mandela did not have a hunger to be free as he thought that he was born free. As long as he obeyed his father and abided by the customs of his tribe, he was free in every way he knew. As a student, he wanted certain “transitory freedoms” only for himself such as being able to say out at night, read what he pleased and go where he chose.

He then talks about certain “basic honorable freedoms” such as achieving his potential of earning his living and of marrying and having a family. He builds the contrast between these two freedoms by stating that the transitory freedoms he wanted were limited to him, whereas the honorable freedoms had to do more with his and his people’s position in society.

Question 3

Does Mandela think the oppressor is free? Why/why not?

Answer

No, Mandela does not think that the oppressor is free. Because an oppressor is the prisoner of hatred.

 

Class 10 English Chapter 2 End-text Answers

Get all the NCERT class 10 English chapter 2 Nelson Mandela Long Walk to Freedom’s end-text questions and answers are given below.

Thinking about the Text

Question 1

Why did such a large number of international leaders attend the inauguration? What did it signify the triumph of?

Answer

The inauguration of a new non-racial government in South Africa was a historic moment in their country as well as world history. Thus several distinguished international leaders attended the inauguration. It signified the triumph of justice, peace, and human dignity.

Question 2

What does Mandela mean when he says he is “simply the sum of all those African patriots” who had gone before him?

Answer

Mandela says so because he only followed the ideal of those African patriots who fought for the rights of his people. He also had to face torture from the whites while doing so.

Question 3

Would you agree that the “depths of oppression” create “heights of character”? How does Mandela illustrate this? Can you add your own examples to this argument?

Answer

Yes, I agree that the “depths of oppression” create “heights of character”. Mandela thought that the decads of brutality and oppression had an unintended effect of creating many African patriots with unimaginable heights of character. Thus he felt that the greatest wealth of South Africa is its people.

In a similar manner, Bhagat Singh remained courageous while facing utmost cruelty at the hands of the British.

Question 4

How did Mandela’s understanding of freedom change with age and experience?

Answer

As a boy, Mandela did not have a hunger for freedom because he thought that he was born free. He believed that as long as he obeyed his father and abided by the customs of his tribe, he was free in every possible manner. He had certain needs as a teenager and certain needs as a young man. Gradually he realized that he was selfish during his boyhood. He slowly understands that it is not just his freedom that is being curtailed, but the freedom of all blacks. It is after attaining this understanding that he develops a hunger for the freedom of his people.

Question 5

How did Mandela’s ‘hunger for freedom’ change his life?

Answer

The hunger for his own freedom became the hunger for the freedom of his people. This desire for a non-racial society transformed him into a virtuous and self-sacrificing man. Thus he joined the African National Congress and this changed him from a frightened young man into a bold man.

 

Thinking about Language

I. There are nouns in the text (formation, government) which are formed from the corresponding verbs (from, govern) by suffixing – (at) ion or ment. There may be a change in the spelling of some verb-noun pairs; such as rebel, rebellion; constitute constitution.

  1. Make a list of such pairs of nouns and verbs in the text.
Noun Verb
rebellion rebel
constitution constitute

Answer

Noun Verb
rebellion rebel
constitution constitute
formation form
government govern
obligation oblige
transformation transform

2. Read the paragraph below. Fill in the blanks with the noun forms of the verbs in brackets.

Martin Luther King’s ——– (contribute) to our history as an outstanding leader began when he came to the —— (assist) of Rossa Parks, a seamstress who refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white passenger. In those days American Blacks were confined t positions of second-class citizenship by restrictive laws and customs. To break these laws would mean —— (subjugate) and —– (humiliate) by the police and the legal system. Beatings, ——- (imprison), and sometimes death awaited those who defied the system. Martin Luther King’s tactics of protest involved non-violent —– (resist) to racial injustice.

Answer

Martin Luther King’s contribution (contribute) to our history as an outstanding leader began when he came to the assistant (assist) of Rossa Parks, a seamstress who refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white passenger. In those days American Blacks were confined t positions of second-class citizenship by restrictive laws and customs. To break these laws would mean subjugation (subjugate) and humiliation (humiliate) by the police and the legal system. Beatings, imprisonment (imprison), and sometimes death awaited those who defied the system. Martin Luther King’s tactics of protest involved non-violent resistance (resist) to racial injustice.

 

Class 10 English Chapter 2 Poem “A Tiger in the Zoo” Answers

Get all questions with proper answers to the NCERT Class 10 English Chapter 2 poem ” A Tiger in the Zoo”.

Thinking about the Poem

Question 1

Read the poem again and work in pairs or groups to do the following tasks.

(i) Find the words that describe the movements and actions of the tiger in the cage and in the wild. Arrange them in two columns.

(ii) Find the words that describe the two places and them in two columns.

Now try to share ideas about how the poet uses words and images to contrast the two situations.

Answer

(i)

In the cage In the wild
Stalks

Few steps of his cage

Quiet rage

Locked in a concrete cell

Stalking the length of his cage

Ignoring visitors

Stares at the brilliant stars

Lurking in shadow

Sliding through log grass

Snarling around houses

Baring his white fangs, his claws

Terrorizing the village

(ii)

Cage Wild
Few steps of his cage

Concrete cell

Locked

Behind bars

Visitors

Patrolling cars

Shadow

Long grass

Water hole

Plump deer

Houses at the jungle’s edge

Village

Question 2

Notice the use of a word repeated in tines such as these:

(i) On pads of velvet quiet,

In his quiet rage.

(ii) And stares with brilliant eyes

At the brilliant stars.

What do you think is the effect of this repetition?

Answer

This repetition is a poetic device used by the poet in order to enhance the beauty of the poem. ‘Velvet quiet’ refers to the quiet velvet pads of the tiger, which can’t run or leap. They can only walk around the limited space in the cage. The use of ‘quiet rage’ symbolizes the anger and ferocity that is building up inside the tiger as it wants to run out into the forest and attack a deer, but the rage is quiet because it can not come out in the open as it is in the cage.

 

That’s the complete questions and answers to the NCERT Class 10 English Chapter 2 Nelson Mandela Long Walk to Freedom and the only poem “A Tiger in the Zoo” of the English First Flight textbook.


More Class 10 English Answers

Chapter 1: A Letter to God

Chapter 2: Nelson Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

Chapter 3: Two Stories about Flying

Chapter 4: From the Diary of Anne Frank

Chapter 5: The Hundred Dresses – I

Chapter 6: The Hundred Dresses – II

Chapter 7: Glimpses of India

Chapter 8: Mijbil the Otter

Chapter 9: Madam Rides the Bus

Chapter 10: The Sermon at Benares

Chapter 11: The Proposal

RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Read More